What should i look for when swirling wine?

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Alverta Murray asked a question: What should i look for when swirling wine?
Asked By: Alverta Murray
Date created: Sun, Jul 18, 2021 8:37 AM
Date updated: Mon, Jul 4, 2022 5:30 PM

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Top best answers to the question «What should i look for when swirling wine»

  • Wine is primarily "tasted" with the nose…
  • Swirling actually eliminates foul-smelling compounds…
  • Swirling in a wide glass is more effective than a narrow glass…
  • Swirling exposes the "legs" of a wine, revealing its viscosity…
  • Yes, as a matter of fact, it does look cool.

9 other answers

Oxygen is a friend and also an enemy of wine— frenemy. In the beginning, oxygen is really great for a wine because as soon as a wine encounters oxygen, it begins to break down, which most people...

The easiest way to start swirling is to place your thumb and forefinger at the base of a stemmed wine glass while it’s siting on the table. Then, draw little circles on the table while gripping the base of the glass.

Swirling the wine allows you to simply see the color better. As the wine spins and goes up the sides of the glass, it forms a color gradient you can easily observe the hues of, through the wine. Legs and viscosity: In addition, the way the wine swirls gives you a first indication of its thickness or viscosity; its texture if you wish. A dense wine, full of tannins or sugar will tend to spin more slowly around the vessel, sticking to the sides of the glass.

Smell the wine by placing the glass close to your nose and taking a quick whiff. Since swirling will agitate the aroma compounds, the best time to smell your wine is after you’ve swirled it. At this point, you can always look more closely at your wine and observe its color, texture, and general aroma.

Swirling releases the wine bouquet. When you swirl a glass of wine, you release literally hundreds of unique aroma compounds, which attach themselves to the oxygen in the air. This helps separate the aromas in the wine, enriching the smelling and tasting experience. Swirling exposes the wine’s “legs” or “tears.”

Swirling exposes the "legs" of a wine, revealing its viscosity. The way the wine swirls gives you a first indication of the wine' "texture:" its thickness or viscosity. A dense wine, full of tannins or sugar will tend to spin more slowly around the glass, sticking to the sides.

There are plenty of different techniques when it comes to swirling wine. Most people keep the base of their wine glass in contact with the table, and make subtle circular movements in order to get the wine spinning in the glass and slightly sloshing up the sides.

When the wine is first poured into your glass — before swirling it, smelling it, or sipping it — just look at it. The reason you look at the wine is to get a sense of its color, as a wine’s color...

How: Give the glass a swirl (you want to do this in a circular motion and stick to one direction to avoid jotting the wine too roughly). Swirling the glass increases interaction of wine with oxygen, which will release aromatic molecules and enrich the tasting experience. What to look for: Cleanliness-- Take a quick sniff. Determine if the bottle is good.

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