Tartrate crystals in wine?

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Emerson Gottlieb asked a question: Tartrate crystals in wine?
Asked By: Emerson Gottlieb
Date created: Wed, Jul 7, 2021 12:16 AM
Date updated: Mon, Jul 25, 2022 12:14 PM

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Top best answers to the question «Tartrate crystals in wine»

  • Don’t panic – those small crystals are called tartrates and they are simply a sign of how the wine was made and are harmless to you and your wine. Tartrates – or more lovingly, “wine diamonds” – are formed from tartaric acid which is naturally occurring in all wines and provides structure, balance and flavor.

Don't panic – those small crystals are called tartrates and they are simply a sign of how the wine was made and are harmless to you and your wine. Tartrates – or more lovingly, “wine diamonds” – are formed from tartaric acid which is naturally occurring in all wines and provides structure, balance and flavor.

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Tartaric crystals—wine diamonds—are found on the cork or floating in the wine. They are the color of the wine. They can be an indicator of quality. Three main acids are in wine: tartaric, malic, and lactic. All are completely natural.

Actually, the “little white things” are Tartrate (Tar-trate) crystals (also called wine diamonds) and are absolutely harmless. You may also find them at the bottom of the wine bottle or sometimes they’ll end up in your wine glass. Personally I have had them show up on the bottom of corks and in my wine glass.

Tartrate crystals in wine trace their roots back to tartaric acid, one of the main acids that occurs in wine grapes. Wine diamonds can be present in either red or white wines, and their formation is linked to temperature.

Tartrate crystals in white wine have been described as having a similar appearance to shards of glass or have been mistaken for unwanted or unnatural sediment – this is simply not the case. Though their appearance may be a bit off-putting, tartrates are completely harmless. Cold Stabilization: negative effects on wine Some winemakers choose to cold stabilize their wines to eliminate the future formation of tartrate crystals.

The potassium tartrate crystals or 'wine diamonds', as they are sometimes called, are formed naturally during the course of the winemaking process and are small, clear or white. There are many naturally occurring grape acids, the main one being tartaric, others include malic, lactic, acetic and citric acid.

“Tartrate crystals are as natural to wine as seeds are to a watermelon.” — Ronn Wiegand, Master of Wine/Master Sommelier Tartrates, affectionately known by industry professionals as “wine diamonds,” are tiny, crystalline deposits that occur in wines when potassium and tartaric acid—both naturally occurring products of grapes—bind together to form a crystal.

Tartrate crystals unfortunately can resemble tiny shards of glass, but more often just resemble salt granules, and are usually quite noticeable in white wines. You’ll also sometimes see them on the underside of a cork.

The variables that determine how many tartrate crystals a wine will throw in its lifetime are multifold and hard to fully understand. In wines with high tartaric acid content, low temperature and high ethanol content, you’ll generally see more tartrates falling out over a long period of time.

Tartrate Crystals – a feature of fine wine. To set the record straight: tartrate crystals in wine, known as "Weinstein" in German, are neither harmful nor a sign of poor quality; on the contrary, they are characteristic of wines that are rich in minerals.

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