Port wine stain and glaucoma?

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Leonard Gleason asked a question: Port wine stain and glaucoma?
Asked By: Leonard Gleason
Date created: Tue, Jun 29, 2021 3:17 PM
Date updated: Tue, Aug 30, 2022 7:38 PM

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Top best answers to the question «Port wine stain and glaucoma»

Glaucoma is a significant ocular hazard in children with facial port wine stain that may not be evident on the initial presentation. The presentation is usually with a clear cornea and surgical intervention is associated with a high success rate and a low rate of complications.

The location of facial port-wine stain (PWS) may be helpful for predicting some associated anomalies; high glaucoma incidence is found in patients with eyes close to PWS-affected areas (V1, ophthalmic branch area of the trigeminal nerve).The location of facial port-wine stain (PWS) may be helpful for predicting some associated anomalies; high glaucoma
high glaucoma
The prevalence of ocular hypertension in the general population ranges between 2.7–3.8% [21,27–29]. OHT increases with age, from 1.7–2.7% in the age group of 40 to 49 years, 2.7–4.6% in the 50 to 59 years range, to 4.1–7.5% in people older than 80 years [21,28,29].
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov › pmc › articles › PMC4842331
incidence is found in patients with eyes close to PWS-affected areas (V1, ophthalmic branch area of the trigeminal nerve).

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Facial Port-Wine Stain Phenotypes Associated with Glaucoma Risk in Neonates Among the newborns with facial PWS, 1) a greater extent of birthmarks involving the S2 area, and 2) lesions including the lower eyelid were associated with higher risk of glaucoma development within the neonatal period.

A χ 2 test was used to compare the children who received laser treatment for the port-wine stains to those who did not receive laser treatment in terms of whether or not they developed glaucoma. Assuming the incidence of glaucoma in the non-laser group to be 50%, we estimate that 326 subjects would be required to detect a 20% increase in the glaucoma incidence in the laser treated group with 80% power.

Conclusion: Glaucoma is a significant ocular hazard in children with facial port wine stain that may not be evident on the initial presentation. The presentation is usually with a clear cornea and surgical intervention is associated with a high success rate and a low rate of complications.

Table data show univariate and multivariate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals of significant risk factors for glaucoma diagnosis in neonates with facial port-wine stains. Representative Cases Figure 2 shows representative cases of neonates with facial PWS together with their ophthalmologic examination results (ie, facial photographs, anterior segment photographs, and colored fundus photographs).

Twelve patients had glaucoma, with the port-wine stains involving the ophthalmic (V1) division of the trigeminal nerve. The highest proportion of patients with glaucoma came from those with involvement of the maxillary (V2) and/or mandibular (V3) division of the trigeminal nerve. No patients had Sturge-Weber syndrome with V3 port-wine stains alone.

Hennedige et al. reported that patients with PWS only in the V1 dermatome had a 6.7% risk of glaucoma and 26.7% risk of neurologic manifestations. They reported no risk of glaucoma and a lower risk of neurologic manifestations, 3.1%, when only the V2 distribution was involved.

Facial port-wine stains (PWSs) are usually isolated findings; however, when associated with cerebral and ocular vascular malformations they form part of the classical triad of Sturge–Weber syndrome (SWS).

Most port-wine stains are harmless. But they can sometimes lead to the development of an eye condition called glaucoma if they’re located near the eyes. Glaucoma involves high pressure in the eye,...

Port-wine vascular malformations and glaucoma risk in Sturge-Weber syndrome. This retrospective review did not find evidence to suggest that laser treatment of port-wine vascular malformations causes glaucoma or that it can worsen a preexisting ocular hypertension or glaucoma. Statistical analysis was inconclusive.

The classic triad of SWS consists of facial cutaneous venous dilation, often called port-wine stain (PWS), leptomeningeal capillary-venous malformation, and ocular abnormalities. This review discusses the clinical features of SWS with an emphasis on secondary glaucoma, the most common ocular manifestation of this disorder. Cutaneous Features

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